Thursday, November 8, 2018


For those who like a wide band, a Bear ring 3/4" wide in sterling silver. 










#northwestCoastIndianArt #firstNationsArt #nativeArt #nativeAmericanArt #pacificNativeArt #indigenousArt #canadianAboriginalArt #kwakiutl www.davidneelstudio.com www.davidneel.com

I am working on silver pendants for Christmas - Bear, Butterfly and Eagle. 






#northwestCoastIndianArt #firstNationsArt #nativeArt #nativeAmericanArt #pacificNativeArt #indigenousArt #canadianAboriginalArt #kwakiutl www.davidneelstudio.com www.davidneel.com

Tuesday, October 23, 2018



A Raven Pendant in 23K gold. I do love working in 24K (96.5% pure) gold. It is easy to see why it is called the "Noble Metal."


My art is featured on the current issue of the Journal of Canadian Art History. 
Inside is an article on Life on the 18th Hole, by Dr. Carolyn Butler-Palmer of the University of Victoria. 


#northwestCoastIndianArt #firstNationsArt #nativeArt #nativeAmericanArt #pacificNativeArt #indigenousArt #canadianAboriginalArt #kwakiutl www.davidneelstudio.com


Sunday, October 14, 2018


The Thunderbird that Came Down From Above
23K Gold and Abalone Shell 


#northwestCoastIndian #firstNations #indigenousArt  #nativeAmerican #canadianAboriginal #kwakiutl www.davidneel.com and www.davidneelstudio.com





Portrait of Emma Martin – a Highborn Woman

In the time of our great-grandparents, a number of Kwakwaka’wakw people were sent to jail for singing and dancing: traditional Indigenous culture was unlawful at that time. They served their sentences at Oakalla Prison near Vancouver, far away from their communities and families.

One woman, Emma Martin, felt that she had to do something to help her people so she left her village and went to live in the city, where she visited the people, she brought them gifts of food and other items to help them during their incarceration, and when they were released she gave them money and clothes to return home. She is a heroine of the Kwakwaka’wakw and serves as a role model for those who remember her.

The labret in her lower lip represents her status as a high born woman, with copper having special historical / cultural significance. The face on the forehead represents the people that she helped.



#northwestCoastIndian #firstNations #indigenousArt  #nativeAmerican #canadianAboriginal #kwakiutl www.davidneel.com


Monday, October 8, 2018